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Go for a Walk

It is Sunday where I live and the sun is shining. I don’t really need a reason or an excuse to go for a walk. Since the 10,000 step craze started we usually add 10 to 20k to the counter. It isn’t just the act of putting one foot in front of the other (that is important for physical and mental health) and it isn’t just about the destination (10k steps) however much I focus on getting to where I am going. It can and should be about the stroll.

 

What do your senses tell you about the journey. Is the light glinting off water? Are there buds on the trees? Robins, waxwings, nuthatches and chickadees are singing. You might even hear a warbler. I always enjoy the smells of the season. There is a wift of campfire and a hint of bbq in the air. The yeast plan and the brewery are steaming away and it is clear that a skunk passed by (or someone using something medicinal).

My feet appreciate the pathway but relish the softness of the earth when I escape the prescribed route and trek across the grass.  The breeze on my face is still cool but the sun is endeavoring to raise the temperature and there is a dampness in the middle of my back.

I pick up my pace and can feel my heart raise it’s tempo. My breath is deeper and my lungs love the ¬†expansion of deeper inhaling. I chance to meet someone who I haven’t seen in years and a conversation, at first tentative and then intimate ensues. I notice changes in the neighbourhood that aren’t visible at a different speed (driving or biking).

The walk is good for me. Good for my soul. It can be good for you too.

 

Make Today Remarkable,by taking a walk,

B

Uncategorized

The Art of Aging

I am reading Sherwin B Nuland’s “The Art of Aging” and in chapter 2 he writes about the weakening of the immune system over the age of 60 and what we can do, peripherally, to reduce the weakening and possibly strengthen it.

Regular readers know that I often latch onto an idea and twist it 72 degrees to see what happens and what I observe. In this case, I started wondering about a compassion immune system – how we react to the tragedies and calamities of others.

immunity

A strong compassion immune system allows me to fight off the feelings of sadness, benevolence and other forms of caring. It may reduce the ability and willingness to act in support of others. I may even feel superior in my non-tragic and non-calamitous circumstances. Some symptoms of a strong compassion immune system are a blind eye, a cold heart, and a twitching thumb over the channel changer of a remote control. Maintenance of this strong system is easy. You just need to continue not caring, not noticing and not acting. The inertia of the system adds thickness to the skin and further reduces the temperature of the heart. Left alone the compassion immune system will isolate, blame, chastise, and lead to solitude and silence.

Weakening the compassion immune system takes work and time. Caring no longer seems to come easily. We need to restructure our environment so that we come into more direct contact with others. We must evaluate our own weaknesses and seek assistance from others. We should seek opportunities to walk alongside or in the shoes of others. But as with strengthening, the more we weaken the more opportunities to weaken further arise.

The symptoms are harder for you to discern but others may begin advising you that you have a bleeding heart, rose colored glasses and a cloak of martyrdom. Ignore their diagnosis for they are trying to strengthen your immunity to the world around you.

Be weak today and get weaker tomorrow,

B